Blog Schedule

I post on Monday with an occasional random blog thrown in for good measure. I do my best to answer all comments via email and visit around on the days I post.

Saturday, April 20, 2013

R is for Reef Bay

For this, my fourth year doing the challenge, I've decided to share place names from the Virgin Islands. For such a small spot in the ocean, it seems like every rock, cove, hill and house has been christened. The names are a unique mix of Spanish, Danish, French, Dutch, English, and African to name a few.



Reef Bay, St. John
It's not called Reef Bay for nothing. As this picture shows, it's a shallow V-shaped bay that is dominated by a reef.

Reef Bay is also the site of a steam-powered sugar mill. A second steam-powered mill is at Adrian.

The Reed Bay plantation was the last sugar factory to close in 1916.

Other R Names:
Ramgoat Cay is next to Henley Cay right off the north shore of St. John, across from Caneel Bay.
Raphune Hill, St. Thomas (pronounced Ra-poon) The road over Raphune is a major artery between downtown and the east end of the island. It can get quite congested, with cars, going in both directions, backed up from the base of the hill to the top.

Ram's Head, in the distance, is the southern most point of St. John.

Rendezvous Bay, St. John. Photo by by Carl's Photography.
View of Rendezvous Bay - St. John - US Virgin Islands - USVI

 Royal Dane Mall, St. Thomas
Also known as the Warehouse District, these long buildings go from the Waterfront to Main Street. In these buildings were stored all the goods the islands produced at the hands of slaves: sugar, rum, tobacco, and cotton to name a few.






Red Hook, St. Thomas is the major ferry hub for St. John and the British islands of Tortola and Virgin Gorda. This is a little video I took of the ferry coming into the dock at Red Hook. As the boat turns you can see St. John on the right and Tortola, BVI in the center distance.

15 comments:

  1. What a fabulously historical place you live in! Am I a dummy if I admit I didn't even know you needed to mill sugar? I thought it was only grain and flour that were milled. Live and learn! Thanks! :-)

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  2. So many R places. I never would have thought you could have so many. I loved Ramgoat Cay. Where did that name come from?

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  3. Hi Bish .. one forgets that ballast was possibly needed on the ships' routes .. interesting they exported bricks and building materials that could easily be sold and then re-used.

    Love the photos here .. cheers Hilary

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  4. Looks like a fun area to wander. Is the sugar factory open for tours?

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  5. The first place my husband and I ever lived together was called Royal Dane. Not nearly as lovely an environment thought. Coming here is like taking a vacation.

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  6. I would love to explore all those alleys. And take the ferry ride.

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  7. I love that old mall! There are areas in Wilmington, NC that look like that, especially down by the waterfront.

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  8. Awesome photos! Such a beautiful spot.

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  9. These photos are really good, Bish. Such clarity and depth to them. I like the narrow streets.
    Your video is wonderful, too. You hold the camera so still. Mine shakes all over.

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  10. That Rendezvous Bay pic is awesome, with the stunning blue water back-dropped by the storms on the horizon! :)

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  11. So many gorgeous pictures. I could lose myself for days (weeks, months) in a place like that.
    ____
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    Blog: http://allysonlindt.com
    email: Allyson.Lindt@gmail.com
    Twitter: @AllysonLindt

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  12. There's the brick walls I've come to know and love. Amazing.

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  13. Lovely places! Thank you so very much and also for the places to download free books. Best regards to you, my friend. Ruby

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  14. Another great day in the VI. The Mall is incredible, unfortunately we don't have anything like that on STX.

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Your Random Thoughts are most welcome!