Blog Schedule

I post on Monday with an occasional random blog thrown in for good measure. I do my best to answer all comments via email and visit around on the days I post.

Monday, April 25, 2011

U is for Umbrage

Umbrage: Middle English from Middle From from Latin umbraticum neuter of umbraticus meaning of shade, from umbratus past participle of umbrare to shade from umbra meaning shade, shadow.

Original definitions include shade, shadow, shady branches, foliage. The word then evolved into meaning something vaguely suggested or hinted at, which led to doubt and suspicion. Finally it evolved into the meaning we know today, a feeling of resentment often at some fancied slight or insult.

I prefer the older meaning. I like the idea of shadow and shady branches, of foliage, of walking beneath ancient trees, in cool dappled light.
Care to take umbrage with me?

It's rather like taking tea don't you think?

Let us not allow ourselves to feel resentment over some fancied slight or insult. Let us instead take a break from our writing and walk among the trees.

17 comments:

  1. Yeah I like that idea. My 'U' post will include some lovely umbrage too!

    Duncan In Kuantan

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  2. I like the old meaning as well. You make it sound lovely.

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  3. The old meaning was better. Has anyone ever seen it used in that context? I certainly haven't. I wouldn't take umbrage at your umbrage.

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  4. Lovely, I much prefer the dappled shade to taking offence.

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  5. I'm with Niki, you really do make it sound lovely!!! I love learning new words and this was an extra special one.

    At first I thought it said Umbridge... and now I want to watch Harry Potter and also change my post to talk about Umbridge, lol.

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  6. I like the word umbrage. I used to use it more. I never think about the the old meaning but thanks to you I will now.

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  7. Love the photo you chose for umbrage. It's inspiring! What's under the umbrage????

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  8. Lovely photo, Bish. I prefer the older meaning too. Awesome description.

    Yes! Let us take a break and walk among the trees. I'm with you. :-)

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  9. Umbrage. I'd never heard of this word before. So thank you for introducing it to me. Now I will go about my day mumbling it to myself in an attempt to remember.

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  10. Ha! Umbrage and tea. I love the etymology of words. Knowing the history only enriches the enjoyment of them.

    Beautiful pictures as always.

    And btw . . . you won the book on my blog. You were the first post and you had the right answer! Send me your address and I'll put the book into the mail.

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  11. Hi Bish ~
    I'm hopping about the A to Z posts - not to procrastinate (read your post on that) but more as a need for a break -- restful thinking -- and your blog is doing a great job in meeting that need. It is providing the umbrage I require for refreshment in my day. Thank you :~)

    Kathy

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  12. Ooh would love to take umbrage with you. Lovely photo, lovely post, lovely word. I like the older meaning as well.
    Karen

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  13. Oh, I love Umbrage! Totally agree, I much prefer the 'walking under ancient trees', -how wonderful. ;-)

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  16. Good word. I immediately thought of J. R. Rowling's character Delores Umbrage. She was the last meaning and well played.
    Nancy
    N. R. Williams, The Treasures of Carmelidrium.

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  17. Taking a break sounds like win to me. Walking under the trees sounds like an even bigger win (wish it wasn't raining hehehe)

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Your Random Thoughts are most welcome!