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I post on Monday with an occasional random blog thrown in for good measure. I do my best to answer all comments via email and visit around on the days I post.

Thursday, February 13, 2014

Definitions

ImageChef.com
 Quote from a counted cross-stitch picture given to my father.

Definitions is an occasional post in which I delve into the meanings of words that are obscure, interesting, or new to me.
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I haven't posted one these in while, probably because I haven't come across a word that's really intrigued me. The other day while doing the New York cross-word puzzle I was presented with a word I'd never heard of. There are a lot of words I never heard of, but this one had so much character, so much possibility, I had to look it up.

SALMAGUNDI

Is it:
1. A salad plate of meats, eggs and vegetables arranged in rows for contrast and drizzled with salad dressing
Romanian Cold Meat Salad
or:

2. Potpourri
Potpourri
or:


3. An art club in New York City, established in 1871?
Salmagundi-club-47-5th-avenue


It is, in actuality, all of these things. You can find out more about the Salmagundi Club HERE.

Salmagundi means: 1.) a salad plate of chopped meats, anchovies, eggs, and vegetables arranged in rows for contrast and dressed with a salad dressing. 2.) a heterogeneous mixture 

It comes from the French word, salmigondis meaning (I LOVE this) a disparate assembly of things, ideas or people, forming an incoherent whole.

I keep thinking there's a story in this word, more particularly, a character. Her name would be:
Salma Gundi.

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Are you familiar with this word? Have you ever had a salmagundi salad? Do you think you'll use it in a sentence in your current WIP?

14 comments:

  1. That's what I dig about the New York Times crossword puzzle - all the new words! I'm surprised that one isn't used more often considering it's meaning.

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  2. LOL, don't think this word will make it into my novel.

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  3. Hi, Bish. Can't say I've heard of this word before today. It might make an interesting character name if you split it up as Salma Gundi. Just a thought.

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  4. I have never heard of this word before. So- thanks for the introduction, picture, and multiple definitions. Now- I just hope I know how to say it. ;)
    ~Jess

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  5. I think I've heard this word before, but this is the first time learning about all of its definitions.

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  6. I have heard this word befor, but never knew what it meant. Now that I've been enlightened, i'm not sure what to do with the information. Ha!

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  7. I read it in a story once. Agatha Christie? Can't remember, but I'd totally forgotten it. That NY Times Crossword is amazing.

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  8. No, I hadn't heard this word before. But I love all three pictures.

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  9. That's a new word to me. Closest word I know is a salamander. Good name for a character. I have a character named Ann Tagonist! :)

    Gary

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  10. Bish, this really is kooky, isn't it?? I can't believe we both posted about THIS SAME STRANGE WORD! (Here's the e-mail I sent after I read your comment on my blog!)

    Hey Bish!! That is incredible! And I swear I did not see your post!! I came across it today when I was searching for a word beginning with "s" that meant misc or hodgepodge, to go with Saturday! Where did you see it? I loved your words about it: "I love how the lines of connectedness work in mysterious ways." Beautifully said! Thanks so much for leaving your comment!!"
    Sent via BlackBerry by AT&T

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  11. Other languages have words that that don't translate into English. It's one reason I have several dictionaries to flick through occasionally.

    Where would we be with Schadenfreude, or cul-de-sac? Much poorer that's for sure.

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  12. Hi Bish - I do know about it .. it appears in Mrs Beeton - the definitive cookery and household bible.

    Fascinating to read it here and to see Becky also found the word recently ... co-incidences.

    Love being reminded of this .. I think I might have thought about using it for my S word in my A-Z last year .. when I referenced British Cookery ... but used Scouse instead ...

    Fascinating to read about the Salmagundi Club .. I'd have never known and it's been going for so long ...

    Cheers Hilary

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Your Random Thoughts are most welcome!